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RAC still getting FIVE TIMES number of breakdown calls due to people running out of fuel

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While fuel stations in some parts of the UK are starting to see a return to normal supplies, motoring organisation the RAC say this is not the case in all parts of the country.

Commenting on the current fuel delivery situation, RAC fuel spokesman Simon Williams said: “While the fuel delivery situation continues to improve in many areas, that’s sadly not the case right across the country. In particular, those drivers that rely on independent forecourts – especially where there aren’t any supermarkets selling fuel – may still be struggling to fill up or be faced with queues.

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“Sadly, smaller petrol stations appear to have been hit particularly hard by so many people refuelling over the weekend and draining their stocks. As their supply chains aren’t as robust as the larger retailers’ many are still struggling to get the deliveries they so desperately need. We know that while these independents don’t sell as much fuel as the supermarkets and oil-company run forecourts, they are still very important to drivers.

“RAC data confirms that nationally things are improving, but are not yet back to normal. Yesterday our patrols still dealt with nearly five times the number of out-of-fuel breakdowns that they would typically attend. In contrast, on Monday when the problem was at its worst they attended 13 times more than on a normal day.”

Meanwhile, with reports of drivers filling containers and even plastic bottles during the worst of the fuel delivery crisis, the RAC is informing drivers of the law around storing fuel at home.

The RAC is reminding people of the laws around storing fuel (Image: RAC)

While the law says you can store up to 30 litres of petrol at home without a licence, that doesn’t mean you should in the current situation. Stockpiling fuel at home when fuel deliveries are disrupted only makes it more difficult for others to get the petrol or diesel they need and homeowners may be putting themselves and others at risk from fire.

What does the law say?

An individual is allowed to store up to 30 litres of petrol without a special licence. There is, however, no specific legal requirement on the storage of diesel in your home.

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How should petrol be stored?

Petrol must be stored in the right container: always use proper container that is designed for use with petrol, and make sure it has a tight-fitting cap. You’re allowed to store up to 10 litres in a plastic container, up to 20 litres in a metal ‘jerry’ can and up to 30 litres in a demountable fuel tank, such as from a small boat. Storing petrol is a fire risk, so keep it in a secure outbuilding – like a shed or garage – that is away from any sources of ignition and is cool and well ventilated. Never store it outside or inside your house, and of course keep it well out of the reach of children and pets. While diesel is not flammable like petrol, it can still pose a danger, so it’s advisable to follow the same steps.

How long can I keep fuel for?

Petrol has a shelf-life of around six months if stored in a sealed container at 20 degrees – or just three months if kept at 30 degrees. The more it’s exposed to heat, the more quickly it will go off. If the petrol is contaminated in any way, the quality will start to fall away sooner.

The RAC’s view:

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RAC fuel spokesman Simon Williams said: “Just because it’s legal to store up to 30 litres of petrol at home, doesn’t mean it’s the right thing to do when so many drivers have been struggling to get the fuel they need to go to work and carry out their important daily tasks. Those who need to should follow the law carefully to keep themselves, their families and neighbours safe. Petrol should always be kept in the proper containers in an outbuilding and never left outside.”

(Lead image: RAC)

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