blank
Connect with us

Motoring

Three battery electric cars sold for every one new diesel car in September

Published

on

The UK new car market has recorded its weakest September since 1998 ahead of the introduction of the two-plate system in 1999, according to figures published today by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT).

Some 215,312 cars were registered in the month, a -34.4% fall on September 2020, when pandemic restrictions were significantly curtailing economic activity.

September is typically the second busiest month of the year for the industry, but with the ongoing shortage of semiconductors impacting vehicle availability, the 2021 performance was down some -44.7% on the pre-pandemic ten-year average.

However, September was the best month ever for new battery electric vehicle (BEV) uptake. With a market share of 15.2%, 32,721 BEVs joined the road in the month, reflecting the wide range of models now available and growing consumer appetite.

Indeed, the September performance was just over 5,000 shy of the total number registered during the whole of 2019.

(Table: SMMT)

Plug-in hybrid (PHEV) share also grew to 6.4%, meaning more than one in five new cars registered in September was zero-emission capable.

Meanwhile, hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) grew their overall market share from 8.0% in 2020 to 11.6%, with 24,961 registered in the month.

(Table: SMMT)

Looking at market segmentation, private demand was down -25.3% with 120,560 new registrations in the month, but a bigger fall was recorded in large fleets, which declined by -43.1% to 90,445 units.

As a result of the month’s disappointing performance, registrations year to date are now only 5.9% ahead of 2020 figures, and -29.4% down on the pre-pandemic decade-long average.

Advertisement
(Table: SMMT)

Mike Hawes, SMMT Chief Executive said, “This is a desperately disappointing September and further evidence of the ongoing impact of the Covid pandemic on the sector. Despite strong demand for new vehicles over the summer, three successive months have been hit by stalled supply due to reduced semiconductor availability, especially from Asia. Nevertheless, manufacturers are taking every measure possible to maintain deliveries and customers can expect attractive offers on a range of new vehicles.

“Despite these challenges, the rocketing uptake of plug-in vehicles, especially battery electric cars, demonstrates the increasing demand for these new technologies. However, to meet our collective decarbonisation ambitions, we need to ensure all drivers can make the switch – not just those with private driveways – requiring a massive investment in public recharging infrastructure. Chargepoint roll-out must keep pace with the acceleration in plug-in vehicle registrations.”  

RAC director of EVs Sarah Winward-Kotecha said: “Against a backdrop of generally poor new car sales, September was a milestone month when it came to battery electric models with nearly as many sold in one month as were sold throughout the whole of 2019. Plug-in cars now account for 16% of all new car sales so far this year.

“What’s more, sales of electric cars have eclipsed diesel sales by a huge margin with three battery electric cars sold for every one new diesel car that went onto the road. This now looks like the end of the road for diesel as nearly 67,000 fewer diesel cars were registered this September than was the case in September 2019, representing an astonishing 86% drop in just two years.

“These figures show there’s clear momentum when it comes to electric car adoption in the UK, but had it not been for the chip shortage which is hampering new car production, the numbers may well have been even higher.

“Fortunately, when it comes to EVs there are a variety of ways drivers can now make the switch in a more affordable way, not least through leasing schemes such as those offered by the RAC.”

Advertisement

(Lead image: RAC)

Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Money

Cheapest car insurance falls to six month low despite return of traffic

Published

on

By

woman in yellow shirt driving a silver car

The cheapest average premiums quoted have tumbled over the summer to just £533 – a £60 drop year-on-year.

This is the lowest quarterly average for cheapest premiums available since summer 2015.

The fall in the cheapest average premiums has driven up savings available to motorists. Drivers can save an average of £98 on their car insurance by switching to the cheapest deal when their policy expires. 

The average annual car insurance premium declined by £71 year-on-year across the summer months (June – August), according to the latest Premium Drivers research from comparethemarket.com.

The average premium now stands at £631, compared with an average of £702 for the same three-month period in 2020. 

In each lockdown since March 2020, the cost of car insurance had fallen due to fewer cars being on the road and a subsequent drop in claims. Insurers had used savings from fewer claims to offer lower premiums to customers. However, the average motor insurance premium has also declined in recent months, from £644 in June 21 to £617 in August 21.

Advertisement

The fall in premiums over the past three months is surprising, as more Covid-19 travel curbs were relaxed and road traffic increased in this time. In fact, road traffic has reverted to pre-pandemic levels with car use returning to 98% of its February 2020 level, on average in August 2021, according to figures from the Department of Transport1. This more recent fall in premiums suggests insurers may be competing more aggressively to attract new customers.  

Young motorists can benefit from the greatest savings by switching car insurance. The average premium for drivers aged under 25 has decreased to £1,085, falling from £1,134 in the same three months (June – August) in 2020.

If young drivers shop around for the cheapest deal on average when their policies come up for renewal, they could typically save £201 on their car insurance. 

Lead image: Andrea Piacquadio / Pexels.com)

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Environment

Council to build Baglan ‘EV Charging Park’ for its vehicles

Published

on

By

Neath Port Talbot councillors have approved plans for an electric vehicle charging infrastructure for council fleet vehicles, pool and staff cars paving the way for zero-emission transport in the county borough.

Members of Neath Port Talbot Council’s Streetscene and Engineering Cabinet Board have backed plans to develop an EV ‘Charging Park’ at the council’s premises in The Quays, at the Baglan Energy Park, to support the council’s transition from carbon based fuels to zero emission vehicles.

One of the council’s electric vehicles (Image: NPT Council)

The Charging Park, which will be in the existing staff car park at The Quays, will come with Photovoltaic (PV) solar canopies which will not only contribute to the energy costs but will further enhance the council’s green identity.

The UK Government has announced an end to the sale of new diesel, petrol cars and vans from 2030. Hybrid vehicles will continue to be on sale, however, from 2035, the sale of new hybrid vehicles will also end and all new cars and vans sold in the UK will be zero emission vehicles.

Also, the Welsh Government wants all new cars and light goods vehicles in the Public Sector fleet to be ultra-low emission by 2025 and where practicably possible, all heavy goods vehicles are to be ultra-low emission by 2030.

The Welsh Government Energy Service (WGES) has worked with the council to develop a plan identifying vehicles that will need to be replaced with zero emission vehicles. The council has 58 cars and light vans along with 24 medium vans that are scheduled to be replaced by 2025. It is therefore essential infrastructure is in place to charge these vehicles as they come on-line.

Members were told this was “only the start of the journey” because as the council’s fleet transition from carbon based fuels continues, other locations will also need to be identified to support the charging of vehicles.

Advertisement

The council has already installed a limited number of charge points at Tregelles Court, Tawe Terrace and Port Talbot Civic Centre with a further charge point at Llansawel Place for the Library Service. These new units complement the two twin point charging units already located at the council’s Service Response Centre (SRC) at The Quays. This brings the total to twelve EV charging points for fleet vehicles at various locations within the county borough so far.

Cllr Annette Wingrave, Neath Port Talbot Council’s Cabinet Member for Regeneration and Sustainable Development said: “The move to zero emission transport is in line with this council’s Decarbonisation and Renewable Energy Strategy (DARE) which sets out how the council will lead by example and reduce its own carbon footprint when carrying out its operations and functions.

“It also sets a proactive agenda for the council in its role as community leader, landowner, employer, regulatory body and service provider so we can work in partnership with other public and private sector organisations as well as joining forces with local residents to deliver the changes required for a cleaner, greener future.”

(Lead image: NPT Council)

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Motoring

RAC still getting FIVE TIMES number of breakdown calls due to people running out of fuel

Published

on

By

While fuel stations in some parts of the UK are starting to see a return to normal supplies, motoring organisation the RAC say this is not the case in all parts of the country.

Commenting on the current fuel delivery situation, RAC fuel spokesman Simon Williams said: “While the fuel delivery situation continues to improve in many areas, that’s sadly not the case right across the country. In particular, those drivers that rely on independent forecourts – especially where there aren’t any supermarkets selling fuel – may still be struggling to fill up or be faced with queues.

“Sadly, smaller petrol stations appear to have been hit particularly hard by so many people refuelling over the weekend and draining their stocks. As their supply chains aren’t as robust as the larger retailers’ many are still struggling to get the deliveries they so desperately need. We know that while these independents don’t sell as much fuel as the supermarkets and oil-company run forecourts, they are still very important to drivers.

“RAC data confirms that nationally things are improving, but are not yet back to normal. Yesterday our patrols still dealt with nearly five times the number of out-of-fuel breakdowns that they would typically attend. In contrast, on Monday when the problem was at its worst they attended 13 times more than on a normal day.”

Meanwhile, with reports of drivers filling containers and even plastic bottles during the worst of the fuel delivery crisis, the RAC is informing drivers of the law around storing fuel at home.

The RAC is reminding people of the laws around storing fuel (Image: RAC)

While the law says you can store up to 30 litres of petrol at home without a licence, that doesn’t mean you should in the current situation. Stockpiling fuel at home when fuel deliveries are disrupted only makes it more difficult for others to get the petrol or diesel they need and homeowners may be putting themselves and others at risk from fire.

What does the law say?

Advertisement

An individual is allowed to store up to 30 litres of petrol without a special licence. There is, however, no specific legal requirement on the storage of diesel in your home.

How should petrol be stored?

Petrol must be stored in the right container: always use proper container that is designed for use with petrol, and make sure it has a tight-fitting cap. You’re allowed to store up to 10 litres in a plastic container, up to 20 litres in a metal ‘jerry’ can and up to 30 litres in a demountable fuel tank, such as from a small boat. Storing petrol is a fire risk, so keep it in a secure outbuilding – like a shed or garage – that is away from any sources of ignition and is cool and well ventilated. Never store it outside or inside your house, and of course keep it well out of the reach of children and pets. While diesel is not flammable like petrol, it can still pose a danger, so it’s advisable to follow the same steps.

How long can I keep fuel for?

Petrol has a shelf-life of around six months if stored in a sealed container at 20 degrees – or just three months if kept at 30 degrees. The more it’s exposed to heat, the more quickly it will go off. If the petrol is contaminated in any way, the quality will start to fall away sooner.

Advertisement

The RAC’s view:

RAC fuel spokesman Simon Williams said: “Just because it’s legal to store up to 30 litres of petrol at home, doesn’t mean it’s the right thing to do when so many drivers have been struggling to get the fuel they need to go to work and carry out their important daily tasks. Those who need to should follow the law carefully to keep themselves, their families and neighbours safe. Petrol should always be kept in the proper containers in an outbuilding and never left outside.”

(Lead image: RAC)

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2021 Swansea Bay News