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According to 73,000 pet owner reviews, Swansea is one of the pet-friendliest holiday destinations in Wales!

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dark yellow labrador retriever lying on the sea shore

More and more pet parents are taking their furry friends on holiday with them, but finding out which locations are the pet-friendliest can be difficult.

Holidaymaker demand for pet-friendly destinations has soared in recent years; in 2021, Airbnb reported a 65% increase in searches for pet-friendly holiday lets on the site.

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As such, Petplan analysed over 73,000 reviews made by pet owners on Booking(.com) to find out which locations in Wales and Great Britain are the best locations to go on holiday with your pet.

75.6% of pet owners who had holidayed in Swansea left the highest-rated reviews (7 and above) on Booking(.com) – meaning Swansea is one of the best holiday destinations for pet owners in Wales!

Monmouthshire ranks as the best destination for holidaymakers with pets with 83% of highly-rated reviews from pet owners. 

Powys ranked as the 2nd pet-friendliest holiday destination in Wales with 82.2% of positive reviews and Blaenau Gwent ranked in close third (81.1%). 

Herefordshire is the best place in England to go on holiday with your pet with 88% of highly-rated reviews from pet owners.

Perth and Kinross is the best location in Scotland for holidaying with pets (85.3% of highly-rated reviews). 

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Pet owners ranked The Scottish Highlands as having the best restaurants (93%), Cheshire as having the best quality rooms (100%), and Cumbria as having the best views (83%). 

Before you set off on holiday with your furry friend, check out our top tips to make travelling a much smoother experience for humans and animals alike.

1. Do your research before you travel

If you’re thinking about taking your pet on holiday, it’s really important that you do some key research beforehand. Before you book a hotel, make sure that it’s definitely pet-friendly.

If you’re travelling abroad, you’ll need to look at any entry requirements for the country you’re visiting. Requirements vary by country: for example, some require rabies vaccinations or tapeworm treatment. Legally, all dogs in the UK should be microchipped, so if you’re taking your dog on holiday you should also keep their microchip certificate on hand.

Researching the documents you’ll need to have on hand when you travel, like a pet passport or health certificates, will make crossing borders and getting through customs much smoother. Quarantine times for pets can be very lengthy if you’re travelling internationally and your pet doesn’t meet entry requirements, so research this thoroughly beforehand.

If you’re flying by plane, be sure to check the airline’s policy about travelling with animals and their history of handling pets.

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2. Prioritise your pet’s wellbeing and safety

Your pet’s health and wellbeing is really important, so before you make any travel plans, consider whether your pet would be a good candidate for travelling. Consider your pet’s temperament and how well they cope with travelling, prolonged periods away from home, new people, places, and experiences, and how well they are trained. Look into alternative options like leaving your pet at a boarding centre or finding a house sitter if you feel that your pet would find accompanying you on holiday stressful.

If you do choose to take your pet with you, pet insurance should cover your pet in case a trip to the vets is needed while you’re on holiday. If your pet is prone to motion sickness and travel anxiety, it may be worth discussing with your vet any possible medicines that will ensure your pet has a more comfortable journey.

If your pet has existing health issues, a vet can discuss this with you and prescribe enough medication to last your entire holiday. A vet will also be able to advise of any recommended vaccinations and treatments to protect against potential health risks endemic to your destination.

3. Pack appropriately for your pet

Before you head off, put together a pet travel kit containing all the things your pet will need on holiday. You’ll want to include enough food and treats for the duration of your trip, your pet’s favourite toys, comfortable bedding, leads and harnesses, waste bags, and first aid supplies. If you’re travelling abroad, you’ll also need to pack relevant documentation (like health certificates and pet passports) for them.

Make sure your pet has fresh water available at all times, too; if you’re travelling in the car, a ‘no spill’ water bowl or bottle might be a worthwhile investment.

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4. Prepare a suitable travel carrier

If you need to use a travel carrier for your pet, give them some time to get used to the carrier before you hit the road. The travel carrier needs to be well-ventilated and spacious enough for your pet to stand up, turn around, and lie down comfortably.

Make sure that you place the travel carrier somewhere out of direct sunlight and away from cold draughts, and that it’s secured by a seat belt. It’s a good idea to place your pet’s favourite toy and a comforting blanket inside the carrier as well.

5. Give your pet ample rest stops

There’s nothing worse than being on a long road trip and needing to use the loo. If you’re driving a long way, make sure you stop frequently to give your pet time to stretch their legs and go to the toilet. If you find a safe place en route, play some energetic games with your pet so that they can burn off some energy before getting back on the road. If you’re flying abroad, make sure your pet has time to go to the toilet before it’s their time to board.

6. Try to keep a regular routine

It will be much easier for your pet to adjust to travelling if you keep their routine as close as possible to what they’re used to. Try to feed them and take them out for toilet breaks and walks at the same times you would do at home. Make sure that fresh water is always available to them, which is especially important if you’re holidaying in a hot climate or you’re doing lots of energetic activities.

7. Watch for signs of stress

While some pets may find travelling a breeze, others may find the experience stressful. Be sure to watch out for signs of stress or motion sickness in your pet so you can make them more comfortable. If you’re on a road trip with a dog, watch out for excessive panting, yawning, dribbling, vomiting, or restlessness.

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If you suspect your dog is anxious, take frequent breaks on your trip. Getting your dog used to short car journeys first (with the help of positive reinforcement) can make it easier for them when it comes to going on a longer road trip. Specially designed travel sprays can also be effective at helping your dog feel calmer in the car.

If your pet is prone to travel sickness, make sure to feed them a light meal before you set off on your journey. Consult your vet before travelling to see if there is any medication that might be able to help your furry friend feel better.

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Pets

Dogs Trust appeals for dog foster carers in Wales to support survivors of domestic abuse

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Dogs Trust is launching its specialist dog fostering service in Wales and urgently needs foster carers to temporarily care for the dogs of survivors of domestic abuse, enabling their owners to flee to safety.

Dogs Trust launched its Freedom Project in 2004, offering a lifeline for dog owners who are escaping from domestic abuse.

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The Freedom Project provides foster homes for dogs and enables survivors to access safe accommodation without the fear of what may happen to their dog if they cannot take them with them.

Joanne Jackson, Freedom Project Regional Manager for Wales, said: “It has become clear that a dedicated pet fostering service is needed in Wales to support people and their pets fleeing domestic abuse. By establishing a specialist pet fostering service in this area, we can help dog owners in Wales find refuge away from their abusive perpetrator, without worrying what will happen to their beloved pet.

“Sadly, there is a strong link between domestic abuse and abuse to pets, with research showing that pets will often be used by a perpetrator as a tool to threaten, coerce and control their partners.

“Each week we will receive a call from someone who is escaping domestic abuse, but they feel they are unable to leave their home until they know their pet will be safe too.

“As many refuges are unable to accept pets, our confidential dog fostering service provides survivors with a lifeline, enabling them to flee to safety knowing that their dog will also be safe and loved until they can be reunited with them.

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“We couldn’t run this life-saving service without our incredible network of volunteer foster carers, who open up their homes and hearts to care for these dogs, knowing that they are not only helping a dog in need, but also directly supporting a family to escape abuse and be able to move on with their lives.

“Fostering comes with many benefits, from encouraging you to keep active and meet other people in your community, through to providing you with company and a waggy tail to wake up to in the morning. On top of this, all the dog’s expenses are covered, and you have the added bonus of knowing you are supporting both a dog and their family get to safety.”

The team are looking for volunteers who are at home during the day, potentially people who are retired or work from home. They must have some experience of caring for dogs and be able to commit to fostering a dog for at least six months, although holiday cover can be provided. All pet food and the cost of veterinary treatment are covered by Dogs Trust.

Sharon** is a volunteer foster carer for the Freedom Project. She said: “The most rewarding part of being a foster carer is that you are helping the dog, but also their human. It is really rewarding when your foster dog is on its way home; envisioning the excitement when they meet up again. 

“I get excited for them; I know they are going to be beside themselves with joy! We talk about it when they have gone- you wonder how they are getting on back with their family, all the while knowing you have given them a loving home for a short time”

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Involvement in fostering through the project is always kept completely confidential to protect both the dogs and the foster carers. Dogs are not fostered within the area that the owner is from and the foster carer will not know who the owner is or where they live.

To find out more about the Freedom Project and to apply to become a foster carer please visit www.dogstrustfreedomproject.org.uk, call 0300 373 0677 or e-mail freedomproject@dogstrust.org.uk

**Names have been changed to protect their anonymity

(Lead image: Dogs Trust)

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Blind rescue dog finds his new human ‘guide’

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An elderly blind dog who came into rescue in Wales at the age of 11 has got a bright future ahead of him after his “cheeky personality” won over his foster carer who decided to permanently adopt him.

Golden oldie Tiny Tim, described as “young at heart,” was in a very poor condition when he arrived at the RSPCA’s Llys Nini Animal Centre in March after his elderly owner was no longer able to care for him.

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As well as sight loss, the little Westie was suffering from a range of health issues including an ear infection, sore skin and a severely matted coat, which had to be shaved in places to make him more comfortable. His teeth, however, were in remarkably good shape for a dog of his age.

Now, three months later, Tiny Tim is thriving with his fosterer Sally Humphries, who has become so attached to the cheeky dog – whose antics include stealing food from the fridge when she isn’t looking – that she’s decided to adopt him permanently.

He is even being taught clicker training by Sally – a type of reward based training where a clicker is used to tell a dog that they have done the right thing – and responds to his name and to instructions such as, ‘sit’, ‘lie,’ ‘step up’ and ‘step down’.

“When I first got Tim home I set up a camera to monitor how he was coping and we started by keeping him on a lead and doing laps around different rooms to help familiarise him with the space,” said Sally, who is also the kennel team leader at Llys Nini Animal Centre. “I put different textures in certain places, for example, a rug in front of the sofa and a towel under his water bowl to get him used to his surroundings.

“Despite his advancing years and the fact that we were advised he would probably need palliative care, he’s got a real zest for life. He’s definitely young at heart and I’ve had to be quite fit to keep up with him! When we go out and about I’m his eyes, so that means doing things like making sure other dogs do not approach him too quickly. He loves being taken for a walk and sniffing out new smells and he’ll climb up on things if you’re not looking, so his blindness isn’t holding him back.

Sally added: “Although I didn’t initially plan to adopt Tim, he’s completely won me and my dad over with his cheeky personality. He’s settled in so well and really enjoys the company of my other rescue dog, Lady.

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“As time went on, I felt it would be unfair to expect him to start all over again with someone new and strange surroundings, particularly at his age, and more so because he’s blind.

“He’s wonderful company and a great example of how an older dog with a disability has so much to give and get out of life.”

Blind dogs are no different to sighted dogs in terms of their ability and desire to learn. Training, using positive, reward based methods is an excellent way to strengthen the bond between a dog and their owner and help the pet learn important life skills and behaviours.

As well as supporting him with his sight loss, Tiny Tim’s skin will also need to be closely monitored by Sally for the rest of his life and his ears bathed daily.

Blind Westie, Tiny Tim has settled into his new forever home (Video RSPCA)

(Lead image: RSPCA)

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‘Keep dogs on a lead around rivers and ponds’- Vets in Wales issue warning about deadly blue-green algae risks

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a dog sitting on the green grass near the lake

The British Veterinary Association (BVA) has issued a warning to pet owners to take extra precautions when walking dogs around freshwater bodies, as warm weather conditions spark concerns about an increased risk of toxic blue green algae growth over the coming months.

The warning follows on the heels of confirmed algal bloom sightings in lakes, ponds or rivers in around 50 locations across the UK, as identified by the UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology’s (UKCEH) Bloomin’ Algae app.

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In late April, a cocker spaniel died of suspected blue green algae poisoning after a swim in Anton Lakes, Hampshire.

Last week, Natural Resources Wales issued a warning for blue-green algae at Bosherston Lakes in Pembrokeshire.

Blue green algae, or cyanobacteria, are a group of bacteria that can contain dangerous toxins which can be harmful and potentially fatal to pets, livestock and birds if ingested even in small quantities.

The algae may appear as green or greenish-brown scum on the surface of water. Dogs can swallow it by drinking water from an affected lake, river or pond or while licking their fur after going for a swim.

It’s possible for dogs to come into contact with the bacteria even if they don’t go into water for a paddle, as toxic blooms are often blown to the edges of water bodies.

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According to trend data supplied by Professor Alan Radford and his team at SAVSNET, University of Liverpool, suspected or confirmed cases reported by veterinary practices peak in July and August, at the height of the summer season, and aren’t restricted to any one part of the UK.

British Veterinary Association President Justine Shotton said: “Many dogs love nothing more than a paddle in a lake to cool off in this weather, but we’d urge pet owners to keep them on a lead during walks near water bodies confirmed to have algal blooms this summer. The majority of blooms are toxic and it is impossible to tell the difference visually, so it is better to be safe than sorry.

“It is also important to be aware of the symptoms of exposure. These commonly include vomiting, diarrhoea, drooling, disorientation, trouble breathing, seizures, and blood in faeces. They can appear within a few minutes or hours of exposure, depending on the type of toxin ingested, and can cause liver damage and ultimately be rapidly fatal if left untreated.

“There is currently no known antidote for the toxins, so dog owners should seek prompt veterinary treatment to tackle their effects and ensure a good chance of recovery for their pet.”

Dr Linda May, a freshwater ecologist at UKCEH, explained: “All reports of suspected blue-green algae are rapidly available to view via the Bloomin’ Algae app, so by submitting records, people are providing a useful early warning to pet owners and watersports enthusiasts.

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“A photograph must be included with all reports so we can quickly check if the bloom is blue-green algae or something harmless.”

BVA has issued the following advice for pet owners:

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